When they had to choose between respecting sharia law…

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.. and respect for basic human rights and freedom of speech..

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…Yale Press chose to respect the hand-choppers. Gawker and Hot Air report on Yale’s disgrace.

The New York Times also attempts to report on the controversy without showing the cartoons, of course. In 2006, the New York Times, like most US media outlets, justified their refusal to respect freedom of expression and basic human rights with this statement -

The New York Times and much of the rest of the nation’s news media have reported on the cartoons but refrained from showing them. That seems a reasonable choice for news organizations that usually refrain from gratuitous assaults on religious symbols, especially since the cartoons are so easy to describe in words.

Both the New York Times and Yale note that the cartoons “can easily be found on the internet.” Well, if people can find all the news that “reasonable” media outlets are too scared to print on the net, it’s no surprise that no one buys newspapers anymore.

Why Exercise Won’t Make You Thin:

You might think half a muffin over an entire day wouldn’t matter much, particularly if you exercise regularly. After all, doesn’t exercise turn fat to muscle, and doesn’t muscle process excess calories more efficiently than fat does?

Yes, although the muscle-fat relationship is often misunderstood. According to calculations published in the journal Obesity Research by a Columbia University team in 2001, a pound of muscle burns approximately six calories a day in a resting body, compared with the two calories that a pound of fat burns. Which means that after you work out hard enough to convert, say, 10 lb. of fat to muscle — a major achievement — you would be able to eat only an extra 40 calories per day, about the amount in a teaspoon of butter, before beginning to gain weight. Good luck with that.

Fundamentally, humans are not a species that evolved to dispose of many extra calories beyond what we need to live. Rats, among other species, have a far greater capacity to cope with excess calories than we do because they have more of a dark-colored tissue called brown fat. Brown fat helps produce a protein that switches off little cellular units called mitochondria, which are the cells’ power plants: they help turn nutrients into energy. When they’re switched off, animals don’t get an energy boost. Instead, the animals literally get warmer. And as their temperature rises, calories burn effortlessly. (See TIME’s health and medicine covers.)

Because rodents have a lot of brown fat, it’s very difficult to make them obese, even when you force-feed them in labs. But humans — we’re pathetic. We have so little brown fat that researchers didn’t even report its existence in adults until earlier this year. That’s one reason humans can gain weight with just an extra half-muffin a day: we almost instantly store most of the calories we don’t need in our regular (“white”) fat cells.

All this helps explain why our herculean exercise over the past 30 years — all the personal trainers, StairMasters and VersaClimbers; all the Pilates classes and yoga retreats and fat camps — hasn’t made us thinner….

…The problem ultimately is about not exercise itself but the way we’ve come to define it. Many obesity researchers now believe that very frequent, low-level physical activity — the kind humans did for tens of thousands of years before the leaf blower was invented — may actually work better for us than the occasional bouts of exercise you get as a gym rat. “You cannot sit still all day long and then have 30 minutes of exercise without producing stress on the muscles,” says Hans-Rudolf Berthoud, a neurobiologist at LSU’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center who has studied nutrition for 20 years. “The muscles will ache, and you may not want to move after. But to burn calories, the muscle movements don’t have to be extreme. It would be better to distribute the movements throughout the day.”

This tends to work for me. I exercise because it helps keep back problems at bay, and because it’s just fun to run fast every once in a while. But changing my eating habits permanently is the only way I’ve ever been able to lose weight.

Nicholas Kristof offers advice on how to hike and camp in the NY/NJ area and not get eaten by bears:

Here’s how to pry yourself and your family off the keyboard and venture into the wild — without feeding a bear. In the same way that you recharge your BlackBerry from time to time, you also should recharge your soul — by spending part of August disconnected from the Web and reconnected with the universe.

In short: Go take a hike! Backpacking is the cheapest of vacations, and it links you intimately and directly to the world around you. It reminds us that we are just a part of the natural order, not lord of it, and that humble acknowledgment is the first step to improve our stewardship.

Backpacking means you take on your shoulders everything you need to hike and camp. The key is to carry very little, say 10 pounds not including food and water. I frequently see tortured backpackers stumbling along as they lug gargantuan packs that dangle frying pans; in their torment, they gaze enviously at my small pack and mistake me for a day-hiker.

So here’s a basic how-to guide:

1. Follow Robert Frost and take the path less traveled by, for that makes all the difference. In the evening, camp where no one else is around. You don’t need a campground: just stop anywhere that is flat. Indeed, the ground in the woods and fields is much softer than the packed dirt of campgrounds. But when you leave in the morning, make sure that you leave no trace.

2. Wear an old pair of running shoes, not a new pair of hiking boots that just give you blisters. One way to tell neophyte weekend hikers from Mexico-to-Canada through-hikers is that the beginners have huge packs and heavy boots, while the through-hikers have sneakers and tiny packs.

3. Try the “ultralight” gear that is revolutionizing backpacking. My beloved basics are the 1-pound G4 pack from Gossamer Gear, with a sleeping pad that doubles as pack frame, and a 1-pound, 13-ounce Ultralite sleeping bag from Western Mountaineering that is warm to 20 degrees.

4. Skip a tent. To keep off rain, carry an ultralight tarp that you tie between two trees and stake to the ground, like a pup tent. But if there’s no rain, sleep under the stars. God made stars so that humans could fall asleep admiring them.

5. A tiny backpacking stove can boil water for freeze-dried dinners that are unpalatable at home and delectable in the field. My kids’ favorite food is “anything cooked in the woods.”…

I used to cook hot dogs and smores in the campfire (when I was able to get a good fire started). Food that doesn’t need to be cooked, like tabouli, hummus and pita is also good. If all else fails, it’s good to keep a supply of power bars & rice krispie treats.

Bugs are also a big part of any effort to get in touch with nature. Long-sleeved light shirts, bug repellent and some mosquito netting under the tarp can really improve your attitude towards the wild.

Today two hour-long rallies were held in the rain to demand Cammarano’s resignation following his arrest and charges of bribery.

Recording Hoboken’s latest 15 minutes of corruption-related fame with my handy Flip:

A Fox 5 reporter rehearses his outrage towards Hoboken Mayor Peter Cammarano in front of city hall as traffic and curious onlookers compete for attention.

The outrage was based on the fact that on “June 23, Cammarano accepted $10,000 in cash from the cooperating witness, in response he said “great, we’re going to be friends for a long time.”
He was one of several political figures arrested in the state’s largest corruption bust.” *

* Info from the written news report and video, here on the Fox News Site

UPDATE: Today my husband bicycled past Cammarano’s house and saw a large group of people protesting, demanding the Mayor’s resignation. According to this article in the Hudson Reporter, “Community backlash grows regarding arrested Hoboken Mayor Cammarano”, there will be another protest on Monday..

Michael Totten reports on The Future of Iraq, Part IV

We were in the predominantly Sunni neighborhood of Adhamiyah. It was a stronghold of support for Saddam Hussein’s government, and a stronghold of support for Al Qaeda more recently. Iraq’s Sunni Arabs, who make up around 15-20 percent of the country’s population, are by the far the most anti-American. Yet Adhamiyah appeared, on the surface at least, to be no more hostile to Americans than Iraqi Kurdistan.

I needed help from reliable straight-shooting Iraqis to see the truth behind the façade. I can’t know if everything Sayid told me was true, but what he told me was a lot more interesting and substantial than the “America good” boilerplate I often heard from random civilians.

What I wanted from Sayid was a glimpse into the Iraqi psyche, which he delivered. He also shared with me his vision of Iraq’s future. And I should warn you that his vision is not pretty. (For optimistic assessments, see The Future of Iraq Part I and The Future of Iraq Part II.)

Four of us sat on couches in his living room – me, Sergeant Franklin, Lieutenant Eric Kuylman, and our Iraqi interpreter “Tom.” We didn’t need to bring Tom with us, though. Sayid spoke near-perfect English.

I’m going to skip the exposition and switch to interview mode. Our conversation speaks for itself.

-

MJT: They say you’re a good guy to talk to because you give straight answers. It’s hard to get straight answers in Iraq.

Sayid: Yeah.

MJT: Can you explain to me why that is? I mean, I have an idea why, but I’m sure you understand it better than I do.

Sayid: It’s the formula of our community. There are many kinds of people. I will give you a straight answer, but it’s Iraqi like me.

Just 20 percent of our people are good. 80 percent are bad. You should know that….

More…

The Star Ledger Reports on Massive NJ corruption…, involving 44 New Jersey elites (including recently elected Hoboken Mayor Peter Cammarano):

NEWARK — The bribes went down in diners, living rooms and parking lots. New Jersey Assemblymen took them, mayors took them, and so did dozens of others…

…It was a sting operation that could have been taken from the pages of an Elmore Leonard novel: the FBI and IRS agents arrested five rabbis, two New Jersey state legislators, three mayors, political operatives, and many others, as part of a probe that spanned from Hoboken to Israel.

Other records were taken from Saint Peter’s College in Jersey City and from at least one synagogue in Deal. Meanwhile, a top member of the Corzine administration unexpectedly resigned after agents arrived at his home and office with evidence boxes…

Among those charged included newly elected Hoboken Mayor Peter Cammarano, 32, and rabbi Saul Kassin, the 87-year-old spiritual leader of the close-knit Syrian Sephardic Jewish community in Deal and Brooklyn. Others were Secaucus Mayor Dennis Elwell, 64; Anthony Suarez, 42, the mayor of Ridgefield; Leona Beldini, 74, the Jersey City deputy mayor; Assemblymen L. Harvey Smith (D-Hudson), 60 and Daniel Van Pelt (R-Ocean), 44; rabbi Edmund Nahum, 56, of Deal; and rabbi Eliahu Ben Haim, 58, of Long Branch. In all, 44 people were charged, 29 of them from New Jersey.

The case had immediate political ramifications, particularly for Democrats in Hudson County and the administration of Gov. Jon Corzine. By the end of the day, Joe Doria Jr., the Commissioner of the Department of Community Affairs, abruptly resigned from his cabinet post after his Trenton office and his home in Bayonne were searched by the FBI.

How things change. Here’s an article from July 1, 2009 “New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine praises Hoboken and its new mayor”

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Photo from the pro-Christie site, “Save New Jersey”

Corzine was already looking vulnerable in the upcoming race for governor.

The only way the Republicans could lose the upcoming race for governor is if they fear being seen as RINOs and focus on ‘family values’.

If they focus on Dem corruption and law and order, it’s likely that Jersey will become a red state. Well, temporarily purplish, maybe…

UPDATE: Dawn Zimmer, who opposed Cammarano in the recent Hoboken mayoral election, is calling for his resignation.

ANOTHER UPDATE: “Beth Mason and Dawn Zimmer say they were also approached by a developer asking for special treatment in Hoboken” :

“And I said maybe and talked to Dawn. She said, ‘I don’t want to take any developer money.’ And I told her, ‘Well, then you have to stop moaning about how much we’re spending — you have to stop telling me we’re throwing away our kids college education.””
According to Stan, Zimmer said she’d “rather write the check herself” than take money from a developer.”

Go Dawn!

AND ANOTHER UPDATE: A petition has been started to urge Cammarano to resign

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